Using digital learning to prevent the spread of Ebola

Using digital learning to prevent the spread of Ebola
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Following the arrival of Ebola on American soil, digital learning allows medical professionals to be trained in safety standards.

The Eric Duncan case has highlighted the urgent need for care facilities to assess their policies for preventing the spread of the Ebola virus and for the protection of workers. Digital learning, supplemented by classroom training, offers a range of opportunities for learning the standards* and protocols defined by OSHA:

Employers must train workers about the sources of Ebola exposure and appropriate precautions. Employers must train workers required to use personal protective equipment on what equipment is necessary, when and how they must use it, and how to dispose of the equipment. In addition where workers are exposed to blood or other potentially infectious materials, employers must provide the training required by the Bloodborne Pathogens standard, including information about how to recognize tasks that may involve exposure and the methods to reduce exposure, including engineering controls, work practices, and personal protective equipment.

Digital learning solutions to train professionals

Imagine classroom sessions complemented by digital learning. To facilitate the work of teams in the field, training is available on a computer, tablet or smartphone, with no Internet connection necessary. All members of a health center may at any time follow a program on:

  • Presentation of risks
  • Overview of procedures
  • Scenarios
  • Knowledge tests
  • Skills validation

Do you also want to provide your employees with training that is accessible offline and available on all media? Contact us to benefit from the DOKEOS experience in medical standards.

Digital learning for the medical sector

According to David Michaels, director of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), cited in The Hill (October 22), incidents of nonfatal occupational illness and injury are twice as high among healthcare workers than most other industries. The medical industry employs 12 million workers in the United States and accounts for 18% of GDP.

Ebola has highlighted the risks that nurses, doctors and other professionals are exposed to every day.

*Standards are: 29 CFR 1910.1030 / 29 CFR 1910.134 / 29 CFR.1910.132

Sources: http://thehill.com/blogs/pundits-blog/healthcare/221459-lessons-from-ebola-patient-zero https://www.osha.gov/SLTC/ebola/control_prevention.html http://www.cdc.gov/vhf/ebola/

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